The 3 “Fatal Flaws” in Local Jingles, according to Randy Hart

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3 FATAL FLAWS IN LOCAL JINGLESLocal advertising comes in a variety of shapes and sizes, and when it comes to music – good and bad.  This is usually due to poor judgement, budget constraints or the advertiser’s relatives being asked to “come up with a jingle.” Maybe their intentions are good, but perhaps their enthusiasm extends beyond their capabilities. Sorry to be crude, but, this my opinion after hearing a variety of ads day in and day out.

Here are three common problems that can be easily fixed with a little thought, sometimes some money and usually some time.

  1. PROBLEM: Poor Arrangement – Finding the nugget of a message to be conveyed and placing it within a song in such a way to give it its optimum positioning takes some thought and experience.  SOLUTION: After you receive a draft of your jingle, live with it a few days to be able to conclude it states your message succinctly and is not too much or too little.
  2. PROBLEM: Just Because It Rhymes… doesn’t make it worthy of inclusion. Particularly in a :30 spot, a clever lyric should be couched in a minimum of words with maximum strength. Trying to say too much can mask the important information. SOLUTION: A good wordsmith can mean the difference between a memorable lyric and one that doesn’t have any staying power. Don’t be afraid to ask for a rewrite (or rewrites) to make it stick.
  3. PROBLEM: Bad Audio Mix – If you have to strain to hear a lyric, or if it’s not enunciated properly, it can be confusing. You also don’t want to miss the punch of the music track. Finding just the right place to place a vocal is key. Not too much, not too little and easy to understand.  SOLUTION: Have your composer or engineer provide you with 2 or 3 different mix versions to choose from, which will allow you to decide how much music under your vocal(s) is the right level to help propel the message.

The proliferation of music production gives many more people the ability to create music. That’s a beautiful thing– but it always pays to remember the basics!

– Randy Hart, CSD for Aircast Custom Music

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